Nanocomposite Thin Films

Self-Assembled Single-Phase Perovskite Nanocomposite Thin Films

Abstract Image† Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139

‡ Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology, Daejeon, 305-701, Republic of Korea

§ Center for Energy Materials Research, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, P.O. Box 131, Cheongryang, Seoul, 130-650, Republic of Korea

National Nano Fab Center 335, Daejeon, 305-806, Republic of Korea

Cover Image Lincoln Laboratory, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Lexington, Massachusetts 02420

Nano Lett., 2010, 10 (2), pp 597–602

DOI: 10.1021/nl903611t

* To whom correspondence should be addressed. E-mail: caross@mit.edu., #

Current address: Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Cornell University, Ithaca, NY 14853.

Section:

Abstract

Thin films of perovskite-structured oxides with general formula ABO3 have great potential in electronic devices because of their unique properties, which include the high dielectric constant of titanates, high-TC superconductivity in cuprates, and colossal magnetoresistance in manganites. These properties are intimately dependent on, and can therefore be tailored by, the microstructure, orientation, and strain state of the film. Here, we demonstrate the growth of cubic Sr(Ti, Fe)O3 (STF) films with an unusual self-assembled nanocomposite microstructure consisting of (100) and (110)-oriented crystals, both of which grow epitaxially with respect to the Si substrate and which are therefore homoepitaxial with each other. These structures differ from previously reported self-assembled oxide nanocomposites, which consist either of two different materials or of single-phase distorted-cubic materials that exhibit two or more variants. Moreover, an epitaxial nanocomposite SrTiO3 overlayer can be grown on the STF, extending the range of compositions over which this microstructure can be formed. This offers the potential for the implementation of self-organized optical/ferromagnetic or ferromagnetic/ferroelectric hybrid nanostructures integrated on technologically important Si substrates with applications in magnetooptical or spintronic devices.

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